Job Profile:      Administrative Secretary (Admin Secretary)


Perform routine administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to callers.

43-6014
Job Information
   
   
37,48055,33076,270

Select Tasks
Greet visitors or callers and handle their inquiries or direct them to the appropriate persons according to their needs.Locate and attach appropriate files to incoming correspondence requiring replies.Open, read, route, and distribute incoming mail or other materials and answer routine letters.
Complete forms in accordance with company procedures.Make copies of correspondence or other printed material.Review work done by others to check for correct spelling and grammar, ensure that company format policies are followed, and recommend revisions.
Learn to operate new office technologies as they are developed and implemented.Maintain scheduling and event calendars.Schedule and confirm appointments for clients, customers, or supervisors.
Manage projects or contribute to committee or team work.Mail newsletters, promotional material, or other information.Order and dispense supplies.
Conduct searches to find needed information, using such sources as the Internet.Provide services to customers, such as order placement or account information.Prepare and mail checks.
Establish work procedures or schedules and keep track of the daily work of clerical staff.Take dictation in shorthand or by machine and transcribe information.Arrange conference, meeting, or travel reservations for office personnel.
Operate electronic mail systems and coordinate the flow of information, internally or with other organizations.Supervise other clerical staff and provide training and orientation to new staff.Use computers for various applications, such as database management or word processing.
Create, maintain, and enter information into databases.Set up and manage paper or electronic filing systems, recording information, updating paperwork, or maintaining documents, such as attendance records, correspondence, or other material.Operate office equipment, such as fax machines, copiers, or phone systems and arrange for repairs when equipment malfunctions.
Compose, type, and distribute meeting notes, routine correspondence, or reports, such as presentations or expense, statistical, or monthly reports.Perform payroll functions, such as maintaining timekeeping information and processing and submitting payroll.Collect and deposit money into accounts, disburse funds from cash accounts to pay bills or invoices, keep records of collections and disbursements, and ensure accounts are balanced.
Coordinate conferences, meetings, or special events, such as luncheons or graduation ceremonies.Develop or maintain internal or external company Web sites.Train and assist staff with computer usage.
Prepare conference or event materials, such as flyers or invitations.





Select Abilities
The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly.
The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures.The ability to quickly make sense of, combine, and organize information into meaningful patterns.The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.
The ability to quickly and accurately compare similarities and differences among sets of letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. The things to be compared may be presented at the same time or one after the other. This ability also includes comparing a presented object with a remembered object.The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.The ability to shift back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources).The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.
The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).The ability to see details at a distance.The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.
The ability to see under low light conditions.The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.The ability to focus on a single source of sound in the presence of other distracting sounds.
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.




Select Tools
Desktop computersDictation equipmentDigital cameras
Handheld calculatorsHandheld computersLaptop computers
Laser facsimile machinesMobile phonesMulti-line telephone systems
PagersPersonal computersPersonal digital assistants PDA
PhotocopiersPhotocopying equipmentScanners

Add Additional Job Requirements:   Work Condition, Physical requirements, Certifications, License, etc.